Friday, June 24, 2011

FEMA - OLD DOG, SAME OLD TRICKS

If you forgot what happened after the hurricanes a few years back, let me refresh your memory.  FEMA, that stellar Federal agency that housed the homeless with manufactured homes that later proved to be so full of formaldehyde that they removed all of them to huge graveyards, is doing it again.

This time they are preparing trailer parks in advance in Joplin, Missouri, instead of just putting the single wides anywhere they could find space.  But the results will be the same.  After the flooding has receded, these homes will be moved to graveyards and sold in build to the highest bidder and the news agencies will do stories about how people are being poisoned by Formaldehyde.

But the really insulting thing is that everyone involved keeps calling them "modular" homes.  


Here is part of the story from the Neosho Daily News:

A 50-acre tract of land south of the Joplin Regional Airport could soon be housing hundreds of families who lost their homes in the May 22 tornado.

The property, owned by the city of Joplin, would be developed into a large, temporary site for hundreds of Federal Emergency Management Agency manufactured housing units, currently staged at Camp Crowder in Neosho.

Twin projects on the property will be developed simultaneously and joined by a large playground area. One section of the project will host 152 mobile units, the other 196 units. Construction will be contracted through the Army Corps of Engineers, and although the timeline could vary, FEMA officials hope work could begin within a week. As of Tuesday morning 624 families had requested aid from FEMA in finding a place to live.hyde.

A 50-acre tract of land south of the Joplin Regional Airport could soon be housing hundreds of families who lost their homes in the May 22 tornado.

The property, owned by the city of Joplin, would be developed into a large, temporary site for hundreds of Federal Emergency Management Agency manufactured housing units, currently staged at Camp Crowder in Neosho.

Twin projects on the property will be developed simultaneously and joined by a large playground area. One section of the project will host 152 mobile units, the other 196 units. Construction will be contracted through the Army Corps of Engineers, and although the timeline could vary, FEMA officials hope work could begin within a week. As of Tuesday morning 624 families had requested aid from FEMA in finding a place to live.
CLICK HERE to read the entire article

4 comments:

William said...

Coach, you have a great vehicle with which to tout the case of WHAT IS A MODULAR and to show examples such as the photo in this post as an example of WHAT IS NOT A MODULAR!
In deference to the question posed on LINKEDIN where no one really discussed the question I think you can open it up, summarize the answers and then send it to the AP and other press groups.

SPeterson said...

Ah, yes, FEMA. That wonderful decision-making group that had 1000s of "FEMA trailers" built for New Orleans after Katrina. Most never made it as HUD, the governing agency for "mobile homes", stated that "mobile homes (read "FEMA trailers) cannot be set in a flood plain.

Want proof as to where most of the FEMA/Katrina "trailers" went? Google maps, search for Hope, Arkansas, turn it to "satellite" view, and pan the map northeast to the Hope Municipal Airport. Zoom in to get the whole effect.

Most of the trailers to the southwest are sunk up to the floor in mud. Most were furnished completely and totally. Most are now worthless. Been there and it is worse on foot.

BTW: Hope, Arkansas is the birthplace of Bill Clinton. Coincidence that these boxes of garbage are being stored in Hope?

SPeterson said...

"Construction will be contracted through the Army Corps of Engineers, and although the timeline could vary, FEMA officials hope work could begin within a week."

A search of the USACE website reveals that nothing has been posted that solicits bids for these units. Knowing how the Corps works, and how much bureacracy is involved in government contracts, it is highly doubtful that anything will start in a week. Just my experienced opinion, but I could be wrong.

Half of Parkersburg, Iowa, was destroyed by an F% tornado in 2008. While not the size of Joplin, Parkersburg was rebuilt using primarily modular homes. In fact, I was able to get into Parkerburg the day after to check on a modular home built 1 year earlier. The home structure suffered mostly cosmetic damage, but was totalled because the "attached" garage was removed from the premises and destroyed the home's roof as it went west. Had the home been without an attached garage, I beleive the home would have lost siding and not much more. The stick-built home across the street looked like Swiss cheese, but was still standing. Pictures were amazing.

Anonymous said...

Unfortunately, it was the RV's that were affected with the formaldehyde and not the manufactured homes.... Why isn't HUD speaking up?