Wednesday, June 15, 2011

HOW TO LOSE CUSTOMERS IN 10 EASY STEPS

Being an independent modular home builder is hard enough today.  There's the housing crisis, hard to find mortgages, harder to find customers and stiff competition from foreclosed and distressed houses coming on the market every day.

So why, with all these things going on, aren't you closing the leads that actually come your way? 

Here's 10 Reasons that you aren't being productive. 
Any one of these will certainly kill the sale. Don't be like most people – let the sale go. There’s always another sale coming around the corner.


Slow lead follow-up.
This is the number one rule. If you forget all of the others, do yourself a favor and remember this one. Sales leads only get more interested in something the more time passes. Think of it like a good bottle of wine. If you know someone needs your product today, how much more will they need it tomorrow? Next year? Let their interest build and contact them years down the road. Real time leads are for suckers.

Don't waste your time prospecting.
Don't waste your time contacting people who aren't in front of you. If they want to do business with you, they'll find you. There's nothing more annoying than receiving a phone call from someone providing a solution to your problem.

No help after the sale.
No good deed goes unpunished. People can, and do, help themselves all the time. Your job is to give them something in return for their money. And if they start talking about any problems they have, tell them that you'd rather not be surrounded by people with a negative attitude.
 
Make friends with tire kickers
Oh sure, anybody can sell to the person that is a decision-maker. But how good of a salesperson would you have to be to convince your friend, who doesn't need your product or even have the money for it, to fall in love with your products? Warning, this one is only for experts.

Don't waste your time on small talk – get to selling!
You already have friends – you don't need new ones. Stop people in their tracks the minute they start to get off-topic. You're there for a sale. Now get to it.


Offer something they don't want
This happens all the time. People don't always know what they want. It's your job to let them know they're wrong and to convince them that they do need what you're offering. 

Do everything yourself
If you want something done, you have to do it yourself. Don't ever forget you got into business for yourself because you know a little more than most people. What do most people know about modular housing anyway?


Offer products that have nothing to do with each other
Look, one product is not going to appeal to everybody. This is why you need to offer at least two products are services that are different from each other.  I remember one business card I received many years ago.  The builder's card said that he "specialized" in new homes, remodeling, demolishing, septic installation and repair, landscaping, fencing and solar panels.  

Come across as a business run from home
A professional demeanor will just make people think you're cocky. Get people to relate to you with casual dress (shorts and a t-shirt work wonders) and an indifferent attitude about your product and service.


Make your company impossible to find on the web
Forget about appearing on search engine results for your keywords. If somebody really wants to push a sale on you, they'll find a way to order from you.

1 comment:

AP said...

Wow! How appropriate. As a potential customer who visited a model house and talked with the same sales person 3-4 times in the course of a month, I had to basically beg for a quote. All I'm doing is waiting for my house to sell and I'm making a purchase! I was so frustrated that I found another builder for the exact same home from the exact same factory. This guy just isn't 25 minutes away. He used all these techniques in his sale, the only one you missed was "well with this lot I don't know how I'm going to get a crane in here". Its called I build a road for you because I need a driveway too! Good blog overall. Thanks, it is good to have some insight into this fairly gray industry.