Wednesday, September 11, 2013

Is Spray Foam Insulation Safe?

It's not often that I find something on Treehugger's website that fits well with this blog but this time I've come across a 5 part series on Foam Insulation.

Since this is something that our industry embraces, I think you should take the time to read Margaret Badore's article and see what modular home buyers are reading. It's quite a read but I think it is worthwhile.

Spray Foam Insulation

READ The 5 Part Series....

6 comments:

Anonymous said...

Coach, what were you thinking? This is so anti-foam and you think we should all read it? And you found it on Treehuger. If you are trying to hurt an entire industry, you couldn't have done a better job.

Coach said...

Anonymous, I didn't feature this article to hurt anybody. I just want to show what builders have to overcome when their new home buyers find these type of articles.

Blame the reporter that wrote the article and Treehugger for publishing it but don't blame me for telling you about it.

Anonymous said...

Is it not at all possible that some of these concerns are justified? I'm sure there were a lot of indignant lead paint and asbestos manufacturers too...

Anonymous said...

What is with the Treehugger hate. Lloyd Alter at Treehugger has long been a HUGE proponent of modular construction...

Coach said...

I don't hate Treehugger. I read their website several times a week and have found a lot of good things. I don't dislike this article either. I just think that builders should be aware of what is being published about something that many of them use in every house.

That called informing, not hating. I even said that it is worthwhile to read this article.

I completely agree that Treehugger is a fan of modular construction but this article needs to be read by every builder.

Anonymous said...

Everyone is entitled to make their minds up and gather as many facts as possible to make an intelligent decision. However, this article shows only one side of the equation. There will always be people who are subject to the chemical odor and composition of these products. But if the product is applied properly, there are usually no issues. It's my belief that there is no bad foam, only bad applications. We are surrounded by polyurethane foams every day; in our car seats and headliners. In our homes in the padded furniture and carpet pad. These are cured urethane flexible foams and the process of curing is complete. When complete, the foams is inert. The article even states that one foam manufacturer has dis-associated themselves form the applicator. The fact that the first part cites that the customer was allowed in the home while the high pressure system was being used is also the fault of the operator. No one should be allowed in the home while this is being done. That is just negligence on the part of the installer. This person may have been predisposed to the effects of the spray, but even someone with no previous respiratory problems will have issues with exposure. That's why the operators use respirators and off site air while spraying the product. I will continue to be a proponent of urethane spray foams. There is far more upside to these products than the small percentage of problems that the industry sees.