Monday, March 10, 2014

Modular Sales Rep Needs Your Help

Today a sales rep for a large modular home builder sent me this email from a potential new modular home buyer. Your comments to this problem will be very much appreciated.


Modcoach,

I had this recent inquiry sent to me from a new modular home prospect.
Dear (sales rep) My husband and I are one home sale away from modular construction.  We are sold on the idea of a sturdy, customizable, home that can be assembled in a short period of time on our site.  However, we have spoken to several modular dealers in our area and all of them have told us that the “craftsman” style home we have chosen should be modified so that all the exterior walls are "even" (in other words, all the exterior walls need to be one continuous line without any stepped in or protruding walls) to make it easier to construct and transport.  We feel that this will totally change the looks of the house (it will look like a mobile home) and are now leaning more to a stick built home, since that isn't a problem for them.  Any suggestions?  (We have bought our lot and are now waiting for our home to sell before beginning construction.) 

His question for readers:


I can think of several reason we can’t build based on mod widths (minimum and maximum) and their plan may be difficult but telling buyers we need straight lines only isn’t one I would verbalize. How do I answer this question about Craftsmen style?

15 comments:

Anonymous said...

The first thing I would do is ask for a copy of the floor plan design that they want to build and then I would let them know how it could be built as a modular home or show them some plans that are similar to what they are looking for.

From the sounds of the responses they were getting from other dealers, more then likely they are speaking with HUDULAR dealers and not true modular home builders.

Steve said...

I agree with asking to review the plans before coming to a decision like straightening the walls....I work for Epoch Homes and we offset walls all the time. As long as it fits under the parameters of modular construction, I don't see a reason why it couldn't be built. Just my 2 cents...
Steve

Anonymous said...

The only limitations we have as modular manufacturers is the size (length, width, and height) of modules we can move down the road. Jogs in walls to create offsets and the craftsman look are no problem whatsoever, so long as the module can be legally transported.

Harris Woodward said...

Yes - get their floor plan and have Coach post it online. You'll get plenty of feedback. What NOT to do: tell them they cannot have the design THEY want because modular is limited. Bull hockey! They said "short period of time" and that's what you'll give them!

Bill Drage said...

The reality is that maybe they should stick build it. I often tell customers that if I can't save them time or money that I am usually sacrificing some sort of architectural detail as well. Having been both a modular builder and a stick builder sometimes when you factor in the additional costs from the factory, the additional shipping, set and crane time as well as the amount of extra time to complete a home similar to this, maybe should be stick built. I think that modular construction is a great way to build, but it's not for every project and sometimes selling a house to a client that shouldn't be built using modular technology doesn't help anyone
Bill
Modular Concepts

Anonymous said...

Hi Coach,
Yes a floor plan of what they are looking for would be great, but I see no issues with designing something Craftsman Style in Modular. Just look at the Bungalows from the "original" modular homes from Sears in the early 1900's, and we have come a long way since then. I would be happy to help with the design. Please see my website under New Home Builders. Thanks Coach
Amy @ NHDC

Scott Stone said...

I'll gladly take the lead. This customer wants exactly what we do. You can forward their name address and phone number to Sales@schiavihomes.com or I'm guessing that the "Dealers" who are presently advising this potential client don't have a computer (Old School) so they can mail the lead to Schiavi Home Builders 754 Main Street Oxford Maine 04270

George Morgan said...

I have been a modular home factory rep for over 28 years and have never heard this one before. Set backs, bump outs and recessed entrys have always been a mainstay for modular. This is no problem for any of the modern factories...

George Morgan
Professional Building Systems

Coach said...

A note for clarification. This sales rep and his potential buyer live in the southeast where HUD rules.

Josh Margulies said...

South East huh? Well that rains on my excitement level.

plants can build anything today (or they will try).

If this rsm is uncomfortable building this house he should refer them out and move on to the next one.

DI said...

Here is an example of a craftsman style that we can pump out with not problem- actually one of our easier mods to build at least in Northern CA.
You need to be mod not HUD- you are doing clients a disservice to sell HUD homes- not easy to get loans on, don't appraise or resell well at all.
http://www.valleyhomedevelopment.com/images/home-styles/home-style-craftsman.jpg

DI said...

Here is a Craftsman that we do all of the time:
http://www.valleyhomedevelopment.com/images/home-styles/home-style-craftsman.jpg

Anonymous said...

I appreciate all these responses, but what bothers me is this: what kind of true modular sales rep couldn't answer this question in the first place?

George Morgan said...

did you not read the responses. You were told in several of the responses that this is NOT a problem for true MODULAR FACTORIES but would be a tremendous problem for HUD. What are you selling...Mobs or Mods ?

I would suggest that you visit some of the mod factories web sites and then have a look at their brochure offerings. The Mod guys do this stuff all the time..

Anonymous said...

The abilities of the industry vary WIDELY. My company works in the commercial sector and see very high-end projects frequently in the NE and PNW whereas the southeast tends to lean towards "barely legal". There are any number of reputable builders who will produce a great looking Craftsmen for this homebuyer.