Monday, June 16, 2014

NYC Testing Modular, Stackable Post-Disaster Housing

OEM Commissioner Joe Bruno on Tuesday announced that a prototype of interim post-disaster housing has been set up. It is a factory-made modular stackable unit that can keep disaster victims in their own neighborhood in permanent housing quickly.



Several city employees will live on and off for the next year in the townhouse-like stack of one three-bedroom unit and two one-bedroom units.
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UPDATE:
Hi Gary:
 
My company built the prototype for NYC OEM & DDC mentioned in your article. If one needs more info on the concept (which is the first ever national system to provide high-quality urban density housing compliant with the nation’s urban building codes) they are welcome to contact me.  Mark Line Industries partnered with American Manufactured Structures and Systems and Garrison Architects to design and fabricate.  The project was partially funded by a FEMA block grant and the client is New York City’s Office of Emergency Management and Department of Design and Construction (DDC) with oversight being provided by USACE.  The Weather Channel’s AMHQ show did a walkthrough amongst other things that I can link you to if you’d like more info.  (And the city itself has a great deal of info on their website for the project).  You can use my contact info below as a POC if needed.
 
Thanks again Gary.
 
John R. Morrison, LEED Green Associate
Marketing + Business Development Director
 
Bristol, IN / Ephrata, PA / Roxboro, NC 
O:  (574) 825-5851 x 239F:   (574) 825-9139C:   (574) 575-0039
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The basic model, a 480-square-foot one bedroom unit, has a combined living room and kitchen, a wheelchair-accessible bathroom, and a small bedroom.


The architect who designed this modular interim housing with indoor heating and air conditioning said it can be placed on city land or even on top of a large store, and can be set up in days. The stack in Downtown Brooklyn took just two days to go from delivery to livable.

What is not clear is the cost effectiveness. The architect said a single one-bedroom unit costs $132,000 now. With mass production, it could go down to $100,000.

If operational and financially viable, it will be at least two years before the stackable housing could house disaster victims in New York City.


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