Monday, February 15, 2016

Irontown Homes Delivers a True Custom Modular Home to Black Hills, SD

Building a million dollar modular home at the Irontown Homes facility in Spanish Fork, Utah and shipping it 700 miles to Black Hills, South Dakota would be a big undertaking for most factories but the folks at Irontown do these types of projects every year.


Consisting of  a main house and a guest house, the owners are creating a fabulous Black Hills retreat.  They’re replacing some older buildings with new, highly energy efficient modular homes.  The homes are 4 modules for the main, and 2 mods for the guest.
The homes have floor to ceiling windows, spa-experience bath retreats, large stacking bifold patio doors, barnwood siding, vertical cedar siding, and bamboo and hickory flooring.
The homes were designed for light, for light to permeate through light wells into the living space.


Open timber roof trusses provides  clean, natural pathway for  the light to move through the house.
The homes are designed by Tomacek Studio Architect in Denver, CO. As the house was just set this past week, all I have at the moment are renderings but I have been promised pictures of the completed home when it is completed. I can't wait!





Brad Tomecek, the Architect for the owners said, "The concept of the design is to feel like you're in the trees, so it's a small detail but all the windows go floor to ceiling and actually they go past the ceiling from the inside which starts to give you these very irregular vertical openings, so it's almost as if you're outside looking through the trees.

While it's still gaining popularity in the Black Hills area, Bill Barber, the general contractor for the house. says modular homes can help save the client about a third of the amount of normal construction time and in some cases can be more cost effective.


Barber  said, "It allowed the owner to make some early decisions on what they wanted and see their product built in a controlled environment. It can speed up construction; instead of building in inclement weather in the wintertime, they're building in a shop in a controlled environment."

The installation posed a difficult challenge for crews because of the narrow roads and heavy equipment needed to install the units.

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