Wednesday, July 13, 2016

Latest Rumor Could Seriously Cripple the Modular Housing Industry

I was just informed by a top Northeastern state official (anonymously) that discussions are going on about third party inspections of modular housing entering the state.


The talks center around eliminating third party inspections and having all code compliance inspections done by the local code enforcement inspectors just like a site built home.

This particular state is very influential that if it were ever put into effect, many other states would begin looking it for their states.

I know, it sounds crazy and something that would drive us back 100 years and probably kill modular housing in the process but knowing that it is even being talked about should scare the crap out of us.

Updates as they come my way and if it looks like it could happen, I will name the state and give everyone the Director's and Secretary's email and phone number.


12 comments:

Anonymous said...

Coach, I don't know where you heard this but I can't believe you actually printed this rumor. No state in their right mind would do away with third party inspections.

William aka "Little Bill" said...

In today's world, anything is possible. If you get the right lobbyist talking to a dumb ass politican who knows nothing, any fire can be started.
Thank you Coach for letting us know about this possible change that could probably affect every modular factory in the North East.

Anonymous said...

Wouldn't be surprised if it was NJ. There are some gung-ho small town inspectors who are the worse. They question things that most don't. They don't trust 3rd party inspectors and give the builder a hard time making them prove everything and anything that they wish. Even to the point of having to rip things about just to prove it was installed correctly.

George Morgan said...

The most influential state as far as other states following their code changes would be New York.....

builder Bob said...

Both NJ and MD code officials want to put modular home inspection back into the local inspector's hands. MD actually discriminates against modular to the point that there's double digit drops in modular housing starts and the number of modular builders.

Anonymous said...

Where's there's smoke, there's usually fire.Since it seems like more than one state is talking about eliminating third party indpections, it becomes a Federal thing and now I blame Obabm.

Tom Hardiman said...

Should it surprise anyone that policy makers are considering rules that business and industry may find harmful? In just the last six months, there have been over 10,000 state bills introduced in the NE and Mid Atlantic states. Additionally, another 6,900 new regulations have been proposed in these regions this year.

If you have business, and you have government, you have issues. This is the primary reason trade associations exist. As of today, there is nothing OFFICIAL pending in NY, NJ, MA, or MD in terms or harmful regulations or legislation. That doesn't mean these conversations are not happening behind closed door though.

William aka "Little Bill" said...

Thank you for the update Tom. I knew that you would be on top of this and let us know what is happening in the state capitals around this great United States of America.
If anything alarming as this rumor ever comes up again, please keep us all informed of the truth.

Anonymous said...

In upstate NY where they hire code inspectors who are willing to work for nothing that's usually what they get, NOTHING. I just finished a 28x 54 ranch on a full foundation complete from the ground up the closest we came to seeing an inspector was the engineer coming back to make sure we were building the septic to his plans. Called to say we were done and the code guy mailed me the CO. Yup they will do just fine with local inspections of mods. Of course we have it the other way a guy with a badge trying to prove something but doesn't know shit. They would be great inspecting mods also. Scary!!

Anonymous said...

Rumors can be a bit misleading at times, but we must focus on the primary issues of State governments. Currently, and this includes every state of the union some more than other, their revenue does not meet their expenses or will soon not meet them. They are in a dilemma. How to increase revenue and unfortunately their only source of money is us the tax basis. If you feel strongly that elimination of third party inspectors will ruin you business by stopping your ability to compete then you better say something. Only if they know that this action will decrease their ultimate total tax revenues will they not act.

It is my belief that a governments main roll is to serve their public, all of the public, not just some. What has happened in recent years that their view is they require a certain amount of funding regardless of the impact on who they serve. We serve the government regardless of the impact on us as tax payers. Only when they change their point of view will the situation work for all parties. So, again if States feel using local employees will increase their revenue, taking into consideration if will lessen tax revenue for some businesses then you better believe they will consider it and enact it. States have no choice they are all running out of money.

Anonymous said...

After seeing the first hand view of the shenanigans Excel and their cronies got away with, the bill is coming due for all those who remain.

More regulation, not less, will be the end result. This will not be the last effort to regulate the industry due to their excesses.

It's time to recognize the damage done by Excel/IBS and recognize the industry has work to do in order to regain the public trust.

Stephen said...

sorry Anonymous, but how can you blame the bankruptcy of Excel as the cause for a bill in some state? That is not even close for a good reason. I cannot believe someone would even say this.
It come down to some lobbyist group that backs inspectors who want more control of what is being located into their jurisdiction.