Thursday, July 20, 2017

Modular Home Destroyed When Crane Tips Over

A modular home under construction in Oak Bluffs on Martha’s Vineyard was mostly destroyed Wednesday when a crane tipped over.
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Town police, fire, EMS and building inspector responded to the scene at Madison avenue on East Chop.

Oak Bluffs fire chief John Rose said the crane was attempting to set the modular home on a foundation when things went awry. “The load was up a little high. The crane began to tilt backwards and then went all the way over,” the fire chief said. No one was hurt in the incident, he said.

The crane came to rest with its cab towering high in the air. The modular units were heavily damaged.

“One module fell into the basement,” Chief Rose said. “The other module on the front half was destroyed by the crane, and the back half was split in half.”

The crane is owne by Baxter Crane of West Yarmouth. Reached by telephone Wednesday, company spokesman Kerry Ames said the next step is to send a representative to the Island to assess damage. She declined to identify the operator.

13 comments:

Carl Nolan said...

What happens next? Will there be a lot of finger pointing at who is to blame? Did the builder order the wrong crane; did the crane company create the problem, will the factory fast track the replacement?

William aka "Little Bill" said...

A big thank you to the man upstairs that no one was hurt

Anonymous said...

The crane company is responsible .It's their decision to set or not. Simple..

Anonymous said...

Now we will need to have an engineer and a physicist with a doctorate on every job site to ensure that we simple folk don't ruin the world.

Coach said...

The Fox TV News in Boston will do an in-depth investigation of about an 30 minutes, call in a wacky engineer that hates modular and before you know it the state will require a backup crane and an onsite engineer for every set. It would have to happen in MA!

Anonymous said...

The modules are from ProFab in Quebec. . . . with The Donald imposing a new 20%+ tariff on lumber from Canada, I wonder if he'll start charging a similar tariff on modules from Canada.

Catherine Taylor said...

My comment isn't based on statistics, just observation. I can't remember the last time I saw a similar article about a crane tipping over during a set. Seems to me, we should be proud of just how safe and efficient our industry is. My guess is that the number of incidents where a house gets damaged during a set is exceptionally low.

Tom Hardiman said...

Thank you Catherine!

Anonymous said...

They needed to use a heavier crane. Cheap ass builder. Cheap ass customers too. Must be those great millennials the owner of this online magazine brags about. Where were the counter weights?

Lol dumb asses

Anonymous said...

last anonymous...You're joking, right? You must be.

I'm going to ignore that guy's stupidity for the rest of this post and point out the problem that you're all casually ignoring. Want to know why this industry will never gain considerable market share? Read the comments here alone. There are 9 posts and each one points the finger a different way. There is no streamlined work-flow or agreement in roles/responsibilities. How do you expect those "great millenials" or anyone else with half a brain to sign and execute contracts when there is so much responsibility simply left up for interpretation.

My two cents.

Chuck Owings said...

Well, I tell my clients right up front that there are 4-5 insurance policies at work when we set the house. The builders liability, the builders workers Comp, the builder's risk policy I demand as part of the contract, the crane company's policy and the owners policy the bank requires for a construction loan. $hit happens! Hopefully you have a clause in your contract dealing with such things that allow you to extend the projected finish date due to things like this. I'd rather plan on spending a few more bucks to be sure we have a proper sized crane on site built into my bid.

Frankie D'Ambra said...

OK, so things happen, let's not fault the product and/or the builder and his or her good intentions and knowledge of the industry and product, this appears to be a direct result of either mechanical and/or human error by the crane company...perhaps they didn't consider the proper weight allowances since the product is being built to a higher wind/roof load based on the northeast climate...next, the crane company is the responsible entity unless a disclaimer was signed prior to them hooking up the section of the home, they are responsible for the home, just like the transporter is responsible from the time he connects his hitch to the tongue, to the time he releases the unit from his/her vehicle. Let's please not loose sight of the many benefits and cost savings this product affords a consumer, and let's not discount in comparison the many injuries that occur at a home site, particularly the ones that are never reported, so in closing, things happen, thank goodness as mentioned no one was injured and maybe the moral of the incident is, "Buy American Modular"!?!?! We have several prominent modular and HUD home manufacturer's in the northeast, within our borders, why go outside especially for a home being placed in the United States of America? I agree to tariff the incoming products regardless of what the product is, support our nation and its employees, not built here, not American!

Anonymous said...

All liability rest on the crane operator,
when he hooked to it he owned it.
End of story