Sunday, February 2, 2020

Have You Heard of the PSTC?

If you have never heard of the Pressure Sensitive Tape Council (PSTC), you’re not alone. I didn’t know they existed before seeing their booth at IBS 2020.


Turns out the pressure sensitive tape people are better organized and offer more training than most modular construction councils or organizations.


They offer training on Fundamentals, Manufacturing and Testing and even Adhesives & Advanced Technologies as well “Tape Week 2020” in May. It’s a four day conference talking about, you guessed it, Pressure Sensitive Tape.


During Tape Week there is 16 hours of networking time with 500 attendees from nearly 100 companies and 10 countries, spanning 10 market segments and 8 industry verticals.

I can’t stress this enough. If the Pressure Sensitive Tape Council can do all this, why can’t the modular housing industry, which I can only assume is filled with people wanting to advance modular housing, at least put forth the effort to build a not only a national modular housing council but one that includes foreign countries where modular is being accepted faster than here in the US.

I’m sure their members stick together better than modular housing folks.

3 comments:

Shawn Corkrean said...

I'm not sure there is a national modular home industry. All real estate is local and so is all home building. There are regional markets (northeast, southeast, midwest, mountain, or west), but even the regional markets have very different sub-markets. Example: Midwest modular home building can be further sub-divided: low price/affordable, moderate/semi-custom, and high custom. All are very different products with very different buyers. The product and buyer variations across the country are significant.

Historically, the industry has been organized around manufacturers. That makes sense on a lot of levels, but it has placed the lion's share of focus on things like manufacturing processes, wholesale sales strategies, etc. These focus areas are universal to all modular factories and make us think there is a national, unified industry. The problem is that the manufacturers rarely involve themselves in anything beyond the factory. There is a significant amount of the industry that does not involve the manufacturers. That is not meant as a put down on manufacturers.

I've always felt that organizing builders serving similar target markets would be a more effective path to growing the "modular industry". There are builders in PA, NC, and IN that have a lot in common with each other, but often don't even know of each other's existence.

The challenge of organizing independent builders is that they like being independent. Organizing them is the equivalent of herding cats. They often don't want to be a part of, or see limited value, in spending their time with a national effort. My guess is that they care a lot more about their profit per home than they do a generic national marketing strategy that is unlikely to benefit them.

Maybe an effort needs to be more bottom up than top down. Something organized around providing practical value for the independent builder.





modcoach said...

Best explanation I've heard in years.

Bill Hart said...

Go no further than than Shawn's real state analogy; think about it for a moment...you mod builder-dealers, yes ALL real estate IS local.. yet the entire real estate industry IS very well organized nationally, regionally,state wide, ACTIVE local chapters etc..INDEED, in fact it's a No ticky, no laundry PROFESSION..you cant play in it w/o being licensed and belonging and paying mandatory dues.. and by the way.. they out sells us houses by house..what 4-5 to one..there IS an opportunity, NOW.. in fact Ive harped about for some time it is the NAHBs BSC..and it could mirror the NARs effectiveness and clout in time. Try it you might even like it.